Can Past Birth Control Methods Impact Fertility

imagesMy husband and I are in the midst of choosing the right permanent birth control method as we feel our family is complete with the three beautiful, healthy children God has blessed us with. Even with that complete feeling we are finding it very difficult to make such a final decision about our ability to produce children. Especially with working so close with woman experiencing the struggles of infertility it feels wrong to voluntarily make the decision to end my own fertility. I have nothing against most permanent forms of birth control, I am just struggling to take that step for my family. While this has been at the forefront of my mind for the past few weeks, I also have wondered how past methods of birth control could impact fertility in general. So began researching and this is what I found.

1- Birth Control methods generally do not cause infertility issues.

According to FertilityAuthority.com, Fernando Gomez, M.D. of the Reproductive Medicine Institute in Orlando, Florida, says there is no scientific evidence that birth control pills cause infertility. “This idea is a common misconception of patients using birth control pills for prolonged periods of time. Birth control pills are the most effective reversible therapy to avoid an unwanted pregnancy.”

2- Some Birth Control methods can actually increase fertility.

In the same article, Dr. Gomez continues, “In fact, since birth control pills inhibit ovulation, some studies have suggested that the use of birth control pills may have a positive effect on preserving women’s ovarian reserve, the number of eggs available for ovulation.”

3- Birth Control Pills can mask signs of infertility.

Because of the way birth control pills regulate monthly cycles, some women may not see signs and symptoms of infertility until after they discontinue use. (infertility.about.com )

4- Obviously the decision to use permanent birth control methods should be made carefully as the chances for conception after most procedures is less than 1%. (contraception.about.com)

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